Family fun on the fells

Running with little (and not so little) legs

With the snow a distant memory, some sun finally and a lockdown Mother’s Day looming, what better way to spend time with your loved ones than getting out on our local fells for some family fun?!

Before I started coaching juniors with CVFR, it was hard to know exactly how & where to start running with my ‘little people’; it all felt a bit trial & error. Since learning a bit more about sport and young people, friends have asked all manner of questions about this topic, & this has intensified since the various lockdowns started. Parents have felt added concern about their kids’ physical and mental wellbeing (or just wanted/needed to wear them out) and looked for ways to get them outside, for all sorts of reasons, if for nothing else, just to get them to take a break from the increased zoom time that comes with schooling via Zoom. 

Themes that come up again and again include how far/long you should run for, how do you make sure children are OK and enjoy themselves, and even how on earth do you get them out the door! To answer these (and other) questions, we’ve teamed up with a range of local runners who take their youngsters onto the moors to learn from their experiences and get some great advice and tips. 

Fred and Cora enjoying the delights of coming downhill

Tess Whitaker runs regularly with ten-year old Fred, and five-year old Cora. Her children have always been interested in running, which she puts down to both their parents being sporty. Aged five, on first moving to Mytholmroyd, Fred was fascinated to see the CVFR juniors run past their living room in Mytholmroyd every Tuesday evening, & he joined as soon as he turned six – even before Tess joined the senior club!   

Tess recalls how this, ‘opened up a whole new world of running’ for the two of them, as they became suddenly aware of what they had ‘on the doorstep’ and ‘just how many new paths and hills there were to discover’. Fred was a natural and loved to race, but when his football team training moved & clashed with club running, he had to choose – with a heavy heart, the team sport came first. But his early experiences at junior running club gave him a stamina on the pitch to run rings around everyone else, even at the end of the match. Moreover, he has kept running with his Mum & even done some racing pre-lockdown (the Cragg challenge and a 10km in Leeds).

Over the past year, running has really helped Tess and her whole family to get through. By the time the lockdown #1 started, her youngest, Cora, was five & desperate to go out with her older brother & Mum. One sunny day, they gave in and took her out on one of the junior club routes. To their surprise, the five-year old absolutely loved this. And since, they’ve made the trip onto the tops a bi-weekly outing.

For Tess, it’s been a real joy to find something she can enjoy with both her children – despite the five-year age gap. More to the point, she has loved feeling ‘safe’, ‘away from all the COVID madness’, alone on the moors with them.  She highlights just how good for all of their mental health getting out on the tops has been and what wonders for your mind even a half hour jog on the moors with the kids can do. 

Richard Hand’s two – Lenon (11) and Farris (8) – have always enjoyed running. When they were little, they loved to watch their dad race & even took part in some junior park runs, alongside local outings together of a weekend or on a spare afternoon. But that was back when ‘the word was normal’, & running was just one sport among many.

Lockdown has changed all that, & Richard describes how going out for a run has become something they’ve ‘all been able to hang on to and enjoy together’. It also provides a much needed ‘reason to get out of the house & get fresh air’.

Over the last year, they’ve gone out x2-3 a week together, usually 3-4 miles a time. Richard is keen to place the emphasis on having fun & creating memories, by keeping it varied and as interesting as possible.

Toby Cotterill runs with both Rowan (9) & Holly (7). Rowan joined CVFR juniors a few years ago & has since really improved in terms of technique. Holly was due to join juniors last Easter & Toby hopes she can do so soon, as she has amazing enthusiasm for getting out running. As with many younger ones, Holly ‘zooms off really quickly’ and just can’t maintain it. He and his wife have been trying to encourage her to take it steady – but it’s not easy!

Toby highlights how, when out with the kids, they mix up walking and running, just as an adult would do when learning to run. Overall, he doesn’t mind how quickly they run; he simply enjoys being out with them in the woods and exploring. He’s certain they love it too & hopes that the fact that they have come to the sport young will mean they ‘get the bug for it’ and keep it up as they get older.

Ben Clff has been running with his two since they were six. He started off small with them and looked for ways of making running fun. He also accepted that running with kids was going to involve quite a lot of walking and faffing around, but ‘once over that hurdle, the rewards have been fantastic’

Fearne and Liz enjoying the fells

Liz Hainsworth loved to run as a young person growing up in the Valley, but she only discovered fell running when on moving to Hebden a little over 30 years ago. Her daughter Fearne (now 13) also loves to run and has done since she was a toddler. Aged six, Fearne joined CVFR juniors and went from strength to strength, competing each year in the Junior Fell English championships (even placing fifth nationally one year), winning her club fell championships several years in a row, and representing her school and Calderdale in cross country. 

Liz describes how much her daughter loves the fells and the mud, not to mention the friends she has made and the camaraderie. Both of them really appreciate how this is something they can do together, outdoors, whatever the weather (although they did really love how nice it was in lockdown #1!) When out with Fearne, Liz is careful to keep distances short – mindful that at 13, the maximum fell race is not much over 3 miles. However, as Fearne has grown older, they now have a particular 4-mile route she likes to do up on Wadsworth Moor.

Liz describes how it has been, ‘lovely during lockdown to have more time to run together and enjoying being outdoors’ and how the last year has made them even more appreciative of what they have and where they can run from their doorstep. Remote learning has made it hard to stay motivated, but when Fearne has got out for a run, it’s been incredibly beneficial and ‘a great release’ to get away from screens and out onto the moors.

As Liz highlights, ‘young people’s well-being and mental health is so important at any time but especially now. If there is one little saying I’ve taught Fearne, which she now will say to me and what we can pass on, it is “you never regret going for a run “.

James Logue’s son Euan (14) has been running for quite a long time, but over the past three years, has started to run further off-road, which means he has also been able to run more with his Dad. James has been careful to build up the distance they run together over time. Now, although most of their runs are still local, they can go further afield on occasion (e.g., over to Pendle Hill). This has proved invaluable, when Euan started getting ‘bored’ with local runs.

Now that he is older, Euan runs regularly on trails and paths and fields around Todmorden on routes he knows well. He and his Dad have gone off together on some longer runs, including in the Dales or The Lakes. Here, James is careful to turn these into an event in themselves e.g., a run up Harter Fell in the Lakes last Summer, where they went away for a couple of days to make the most of it).

Colin Duffield is keen to discussing running with young people from his experience as a father but also coaching juniors. He acknowledges how it’s a real challenge to keep children active and occupied whilst home schooling, especially with all organised sport cancelled. Running as a family has been one way of making sure they do this. But he is also quick to emphasise that the ‘rosy picture of skipping along with your adoring child gazing up at you admiringly’ may not be exactly be the reality of running with your kids! Many parents know only too well the tantrums, complaints about a ‘stitch’ and sulking that can accompany collective family exercise.

That said, when it works, it is quite simply magical, ‘one of the most fulfilling and heart-warming experiences a runner can have’. That is when ‘real memories are made’ and he is mindful that you may even be introducing a young person to ‘something that’ll give them pleasure for the rest of their life’.

For the view from the ‘other’ side: CVFR and GB runner Martin Howard, was happy to share his memories of running as a young person with this Dad. The lessons he was taught when he was young have helped him hold onto how important it is to be active & to appreciate not only the surroundings but also the people you are fortunate enough to run with. 

Martin can’t remember a time when his Dad didn’t run, and this has influenced him a lot. Running with his Dad when he was younger pushed him to be better, which in turn saw him compete locally, then nationally & later internationally. He also has fond memories of his Dad taking him to events & encouraging him. Even now he is older and has achieved his dream – by becoming the U23 English fell running champion at the age of 20 & representing England – he still goes out with his dad, Bob, today & is grateful that he still pushes him to be the best he can.

– CALDER VALLEY NEWS REPORTER: CATHERINE JONES

From Parent to Parent advice on running with kids

Almost all of our parents had the same golden rule: Make sure it’s fun! To do this, they have a range of hints & tips:

  • Tess recommends letting youngsters discover new paths, even when not the planned route.
  • Both Richard & James suggest mixing things up. Richard has found this helps prevent his two from getting bored – even if it’s only running the last route backwards. James sometimes takes his son to other places locally, such as Pendle Hill, just for a change.
  • Several of our parents talked about making runs into adventures in different ways, including:
    • Running off road to keep the terrain more interesting (puddles, mud, etc.)
    • Picking a route with plenty to do & see – including taking the opportunity where possible to explore places you wouldn’t normally go to.
      For example, Richard has taken his children to find the hidden WW2 bunker on Rishworth Moor, & to explore the old railway line in Ripponden. They’re planning a trip to the Roman road at Blackstone Edge next. Similarly, James takes Euan on planned trips to the Lakes etc.
    • Having a fun destination in mind even on shorter runs. Toby does this frequently with his two. For example, last week, they ran to a rope swing, he’d found in the woods.
    • Exploring parks or trails from close to home that lead you to places you haven’t been before. You can try buying yourself a walker’s map and learning how to use it, this. will make the world bigger & more interesting for everyone.
    • The Danes have a saying that there is no such thing as the wrong weather, only the wrong clothing – & that is doubly true when running on the moors. Even if the weather is bad, running can still be fun. Going out in the wind and snow can be another adventure, if you make it one (& play it safe)
  • Stop to look at things! Colin explained that for a generation brought up to travel in cars, we notice more when running – interesting buildings, farm animals, whatever – it won’t lessen the run to take time to notice the world. Similarly, Tess allows her two to stop whenever they want & admire the view or point at a funny sheep, etc.
  • Play with the pace: Try Fartlek, which in addition to being an hilarious word for the average 11-year-old, is a training technique involving short periods of faster running. For instance, from a particular bench to the next one, or from one lamppost to the next. Colin emphasises that when working on technique with youngsters it’s vital to keep things fun (but avoid turning it into a race)!
  • Colin also recommends lightening up & being silly: Have a laugh together – try things like a hopping or running backwards (when safe to do so), without worrying about what passers-by might think.
  • When it’s possible to do so again, many of our parents recommend joining a junior running club, emphasizing how much children get from this in terms of motivation, friendship & camaraderie, alongside training and technique.

Our top practical tips:

  1. Think safety at all times!
    • When running at dusk or after dark, always have the appropriate high-visibility vests & good torches.
    • Proper supervision is important at all times.
    • Explain the Countryside Code to younger ones – it’s useful for lots of reasons.
    • Make sure you have the right clothes for the weather and location. Extra layers in case anything were (heaven forbid) to go wrong. You can get cold quickly up on the fells if you have to stop and walk or sit and wait for help.
  2. Carry all the kit yourself – make sure children have as little to carry as possible.
  3. Take snacks and drinks with you. Ben and James both highlighted how you need lots of these & may need to remind children to eat and drink
  4. Several of our parents recommend having a treat lined up for afterwards, as this will be well-earned. This might include a special location at the end of the run, e.g., a rope swing (Toby) or a river to play in in the summer (James).
  5. Start small – be mindful of distances & recognize that children will get tired be patient. James has noticed with Euan that this often happens after about four miles. Liz was quick to emphasise that there is a reason why fell races for juniors are only around three miles: it’s a long way for smaller legs. How far a child can run will depend on age, development and experience – but remember that younger children aren’t really designed for stamina – it’s easy to put them off by making them run too far.
  6. Make it about them, not you. Personal bests, speed and distance don’t matter. Don’t turn things it into a race, unless they do – it can be incredibly off-putting for a young teen to be slower than their Mum!
  7. Be prepared to faff about and even walk at times, especially when the child wants to (regardless of how you feel about it – even when you are desperate to run). In fact, Toby recommends mixing walking and running at first – pointing out that any adult would do this when learning, so why shouldn’t children. Remember, on trails, ground is often steeper which is harder to run up. Walk if necessary, it may well be just as good for you as running. Whether you walk fast or run, tackling hills regularly is one of the best ways to get fit, regardless of how often you stopped for a breather.
  8. In fact, let your child dictate the speed, pace & distance – respect the speed of the slowest person with you & listen when they say they have gone far enough. If anything, it is typically better to encourage children to run more slowly than they might be inclined (little ones tend to go off at a clip and run out of puff/energy). Pacing is an art to be learned.
  9. Always encourage them, whatever happens. Just like adults, youngsters can have good & bad days. Cut it short if they are finding it tough – don’t risk putting them off completely!

Finally, a parent & a coach, Colin emphasises that not all children want to run – & it’s important to accept that. Even the keen ones may not want to run as often as you might, so don’t force them!  As they become teenagers, they may well be less inclined to run (especially with a parent). Remind them of the link between running fitness & performance & keep them motivated by stressing how running will help iimprove their performance in other sports. Alternatively, just, as Liz has always done with Fearne, remind them they will nearly always feel better for getting out.

Overall, remember, as long as they’re smiling at the end & asking when you can go again, then you’re all winning! The lessons they learn & the memories they make now will truly serve them a lifetime!

– CALDER VALLEY NEWS REPORTER: CATHERINE JONES

Old Stones of the Central Pennines

The Long Stoop

During the third lockdown, and with fell races still cancelled, Calderdale’s fell runners have been seeking other forms of competition. Todmorden Harrier, Phil Hodgson, compiled an eclectic collection of 65 interesting old stones, consisting of prehistoric standing stones and stone circles, medieval crosses and boundary stones, rocks associated with local legend and folklore, and a few less ancient stones and rock carvings.  All the stones are within 12 kilometres of the centre of Hebden Bridge. They included the Boggart Stones above Widdop Reservoir, The Druid’s Slaughter Stone on Boulsworth Hill, The Hoyning Stone and Churn Milk Joan both on Midgley Moor.

Hangingstone or Watersheddles Cross

The snappily titled Interesting Old Stones of the Central South Pennines Challenge was to visit as many of these locations as possible between 23rd December and the end of January. Many members of both Calder Valley Fell Runners and Todmorden Harriers took up the challenge during their daily exercise.  Although many of the stones were on or near paths, others required bog or tussock bashing. Some were navigationally challenging to locate.

Phil said “Competitors should find them awe inspiring, thought provoking and occasionally disappointing, but all of them are “interesting” and worth a look. A worthy challenge for megalithomaniacs, medievalomaniacs and anyone else who wants to see more of our awesome local area”.

The first person to visit all the stones was Todmorden Harrier, Rob Holdsworth who finished on the 2nd of January and Rosie Holdsworth was the first woman to finish.  Jackie Scarf was the first Calder Valley Fell Runner to complete on the 19th of January, shortly followed by Jon Emberton on the same day. 22 people completed the Challenge by the end of January, however Phil has extended the deadline to the 14th of February to allow more people to finish bagging all the stones.

– CALDER VALLEY NEWS REPORTER: tim brooks

Max’s running journey so far

GB athlete Max Wharton first started on his route to international competitions through running cross country at Riverside Juniors in Hebden Bridge. He enjoyed that so much, that he went along with some friends, his sister & his Dad to join Al Whitelaw at Calder Valley Fell Runner’s juniors group in Mytholmroyd – later also joining Mark Goldie’s coaching sessions, which is when he really took a serious interest in running.

Wharton recalls, ‘Mark was instrumental in getting me to the level I am now and made me believe I could achieve a lot in the sport’. With Goldie’s help, at only 15 Wharton earned his first Great Britain vest, competing in the 2012 European Mountain Running Championships in Turkey. Three more competitions followed as a junior, with a career best of 15th & a bronze team medal at the 2013 World Mountain Running Championships in Poland. Wharton also continued running cross country, winning the English Schools Fell Running Championship and the UK Inter-Counties Fell Running Championships a couple of times, plus placing 6th at a British Championship Senior Fell race when he was only 16/17.

At this point, Wharton made the shift to track & in his first year of proper training, he became Yorkshire Champion over 800m and came 4th at the English Schools Athletics Championships. Since then, he has added Northern Champion, England Senior Champion and British Universities Champion – whilst studying for my Sports Science degree in London. In 2018, Wharton was fortunate enough to receive a sports scholarship to study for a masters in Sports management at the University of New Mexico and race for their track team, which he describes as ‘an incredible opportunity to be able to train and compete in the collegiate system in America’ and he absolutely loved his time out there.

This last summer, his studies finished, Wharton returned to a very strange time in the UK. He has done well to secure a job as a consultant for a sports agency, working with athletes to help them secure scholarships to America. He is ‘loving being able to support young athletes with their dream of competing and studying in the States’.

Alongside this, Wharton continues to compete, & is looking forward to Olympic Trials this summer. His other aims include to run 4-miles in the 1500m in under 1500m, the 800m is under 1:46 and to make the National team. He is also looking forward to shifting back to fell running (which involves running quite differently – losing speed to be able to run for longer periods of time). He may even go back to fell racing, describing how ‘you can’t beat the atmosphere at a fell race, just a lot of fun – it’s something I miss’.

Alongside this, Wharton has got into coaching, which he is really enjoying & finding helping others incredibly ‘rewarding’. During lockdown, he completed a personal training qualification & has set up his own small coaching/fitness business, through which he hopes to pass on my knowledge in all things health and fitness, & support as many people as possible in achieving their health and fitness goals – no matter how big or small.

‘If you’re looking for an added bit of motivation, a specific event, or just to get fitter and healthier, I am keen to help’.

To find out more about Wharton’s coaching, go to: http://mwfitness.trainingtiltapp.com/

 

 

– CALDER VALLEY NEWS REPORTER: CATHERINE JONES