Race Ratings explanation

What do the race ratings actually mean?

The intention

It is basically to show how far behind the race leader you were in a race. In brief, a rating of (for instance) 1.52 means that your time was the winner’s time multiplied by 1.52, i.e. that you were 52% slower than the winner.

So over the course of the year you can see if you improving by getting closer to the winning time. Or getting older and slower like me.

But it’s not quite so simple…

The winners of championship races or races like Ben Nevis are faster than the winners of some local races. So being 10% behind Rob Jebb at an English championship race is considerably better than being 10% behind the winner at something like Mytholmroyd for instance.

So we needed some way to evenly compare races, so you can compare your results at all races, however fast the winner was.

And the answer… I apply a factor to the winners time at every race, to make the winner at each race be equivalent to the winner at every other race. This means that your rating at each race should be directly comparable to every other race, whatever the quality of the winner.

[For those who want to know, I do this by comparing the rating of every CVFR runner in the race with their results over the previous dozen or so races, to determine how fast their time indicated the winner was.]

So In Summary…

Your rating is actually how far you would have been behind an imaginary race winner who is consistent from one race to the next. The lower the number, the faster you were

A rating of (for instance) 1.52 means that your time was this race winner’s time multiplied by 1.52, i.e. that you were 52% slower.

So you can directly compare this rating from one race to the next.

Improvement

In the race results I show an “improvement” percentage. This shows how your result compared with your prevous results at races of that distance – a short or medium race result is compared against previous short or medium races, while a long race result is compared against previous long races.

E.g. an improvement of 2% in a short/medium race means that you were 2% faster than your previous results in short/medium races. And an improvement of -3% in a long race means that you were 3% slower than your previous results in long races.

[This comparison looks at races over the last 12 months or so, with more weighting being given to the more recent results.]

I also show if your result was the best rating I have recorded for you all year, or even the best that I have ever recorded for you!

Final Note

The ratings are not perfect. If your fellow CVFR runners have all had poor races then it will make your result look good and your rating would show as better than it should. And vice versa – if other CFVR runners have run really well, it will make your rating look worse than perhaps it should.

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